Subscribe to Cigar Aficionado and receive the digital edition of our Premier issue FREE!

Email this page Print this page
Share this page

Stalking the Tiger

Camilo Villegas's Early Success on the 2006 PGA Tour is Raising the Inevitable Question—Can He Challenge the World's No. 1 Golfer?
Jeff Williams
From the Print Edition:
Camilo Villegas, July/August 2006

(continued from page 3)

Carbone was saving another sponsor exemption for Villegas to the 2006 tournament. The Ford Championship is one of the Tour's most prestigious events and most of the top players compete. Players like Villegas whose status come from the Nationwide Tour money list are often left out. Then Villegas hit the jackpot. He finished in a tie for second at the FBR Open in Scottsdale, Arizona. The $312,000 he won zoomed him up the money list and guaranteed him entry into at least the next few big events, the Ford Championship included. He was on his way to national, and international, exposure.

The "it" man had arrived.

"Johan had been telling me about him for a couple of years," says PGA Tour player Jesper Parnevik, who was the first significant player to wear Lindeberg's golf clothing. "He kept saying, Watch out for this guy. He said he was so photogenic that it's unbelievable. He kept calling him a young Marlon Brando, which was pretty unusual to be calling a golfer that. But Johan has a good sense about these things."

Lindeberg also had a good sense about Villegas's ability. He thought he would be a Tour winner, and Parnevik sees nothing about Villegas's game to think differently. "He's a young kid but he thinks like an experienced player," says Parnevik. "At Doral he missed some short putts, but he did not come away disgusted. He keeps the positive and throws away the negative. To me, he is a modern Seve [Ballesteros]," adds Parnevik, referring to the charismatic Spaniard who won three British Open and two Masters titles.

Villegas, however, hasn't always been upbeat about his game.

"Controlling his emotions is something that Camilo has had to work at," says Alexander. "He's never been a hothead or a club thrower, but he can get upset enough at himself that it could be detrimental. He's a perfectionist, which can be good and it can be bad. He could beat himself up pretty good. My parting words to him were not to get down on himself."

As with so many pros, putting gets Villegas down. Last year, he literally started getting down in an effort to improve that aspect of his game. At the Ford Championship this year, the gallery and the television viewers were introduced to Villegas's acrobatic method of reading putts, balancing himself on one leg, then getting down so low to the putting surface that it looks as if he's lining up a billiard shot. If Fred Couples tried to do that, it would take a crane to hoist him back up. "It was just another way of giving myself a better chance to make putts, to see the line more perfectly," Villegas says about the praying mantis technique.

But perfection has its price. Villegas has always been a perfectionist. His yardage books, drawn to scale, are works of art. He numbers his athletic socks to match up the same pairs every time he washes them. He is fastidious with all of his clothing and keeps a very clean apartment (he has moved into a new home in Gainesville, Florida, which he shares with brother Manuel, a redshirted junior at Florida). "Last year I had a bad year with putting," says Villegas. "I worked a lot on my mechanics. I worked at the Titleist facility in California. I got a lot better, but I was not making putts, and I was getting frustrated. I tried to be more perfect, more perfect, more perfect, and that was going the wrong way. This year, I finish second at FBR and I feel bad over every putt."

So he called Gio Valiante, a sports psychologist who is also a volunteer assistant coach with the Florida golf team. "My mind was not working the right way. I was too concerned about reading the putt perfect, aiming the putt perfect and making a perfect mechanical stroke. He said, Think about shooting a basketball. You just look at the rim and shoot. He said, You are a great athlete, you've been doing this your whole life, don't make it harder on yourself. Look at the cup and hit it. He called it 'Caveman Golf,' going back to when you were a little kid and just looked at the hole and hit it."

The approach worked. After he finished in a tie for second at Doral, Villegas tied for third at the Players Championship against the best field in the game. He had not been guaranteed a spot in the Players field at the start of the week, then fellow Gator Chris DiMarco pulled out after injuring himself skiing. Had Villegas made one more putt and finished alone in third, he would have put himself into the Masters by being in the top 10 on the money list at that time.


< 1 2 3 4 5 >

Share |

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Log In If You're Already Registered At Cigar Aficionado Online

Forgot your password?

Not Registered Yet? Sign up–It's FREE.

FIND A RETAILER NEAR YOU

Search By:

JOIN THE CONVERSATION

    

Cigar Insider

Cigar Aficionado News Watch
A Free E-Mail Newsletter

Introducing a FREE newsletter from the editors of Cigar Aficionado!
Sign Up Today