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Zippo Blu—The Sequel

David Savona
Posted: January 12, 2012

Zippo is arguably the most famous name in lighters. Zippos have gone to war, been featured in film after film, blocked bullets and have set fire reliably since they were first made in 1933. Since then, the company has sold close to 500 million lighters.

For years Zippo has sought to find a home in the cigar market, as traditional Zippo lighters are fired by lighter fluid, an odiferous liquid that can taint a cigar. After several tries, Zippo came out with the Zippo Blu in 2005, a version of a Zippo powered by odorless butane, the preferred fuel for lighting a cigar.

The original Zippo Blu had a different shape than a traditional Zippo lighter, with curves making it look more like a sarcophagus than the familiar Zippo rectangle. The new Zippo Blu2, which was released in November,  is shaped just like a regular Zippo, an improvement in our estimation. Why change an iconic piece of Americana?

As with regular Zippos, the Zippo Blu2 works via a flint—roll the large flint wheel, depress the gas release, and hold it down. This is different from many modern turbo or jet lighters, which operate via electronic ignition. Zippo says the simplicity of the flint-wheel ignition results in reliability. “Performance that no electronic lighter can deliver,” in the company’s parlance.

Inside, a two-stage burner system patented by Zippo sends a thin but long jet of blue and orange flame. The lid opens and snaps shut with the familiar click that will bring back memories to all who have used a Zippo in the past.

Zippo Blu2 lighters are masculine and simple. Some might find they lack the panache of a high-end butane lighter and might be out of place in a ritzy cigar bar, but they are ideal lighters for the golf course, a campsite, or a ski trip. For cigar-smoking anglers, they would make a fine addition to a tackle box.

Zippo Blu2 lighters are made in the United States. While these Zippos don’t feel as sturdy as older models, which seem to have been made with heavier metals, Zippos have a guarantee that’s legendary. The company operates a very simple “It works, or we fix it free,” mentality. If the lighter breaks, they fix it free of charge. It retails for $64.95.

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Comments   14 comment(s)

Andres Ricardo January 12, 2012 5:48pm ET

I love it. American made and lifetime guarantee. I can´t see choosing any other lighter besides this American icon. Thank you Zippo.


STEVEN ROBERTS — CALGARY, AB, CANADA,  —  January 12, 2012 6:53pm ET

That looks awesome, love it! do they come with art work on 'em like old school zippos if not they should consider it huge money to be made there.


Gary G. — Southern California,  —  January 12, 2012 7:14pm ET

Even though it costs less then my ST Dupont Maxijet, the result seems the same; a single flame. Pretty much any lighter works in benign conditions. What wasn't addressed was how it performs in windy conditions, and how often it needs a refill. My ST Dupont single flame has been tested over and over in wind and it's not let me down yet. And, I use it for two weeks before having to refill.


Rob MacKay — CA,  —  January 12, 2012 8:51pm ET

$64.95? I don't think so. Much cheaper on Amazon. Great lighter! I love mine.


Kevin Feteira — Hamilton, Ontario, Canada,  —  January 12, 2012 10:55pm ET

Im a huge zippo buff its all I use, Ive heard the stories of people saying the traditional zippo give their cigars or cigerettes a funny taste or smell but in all the years ive used mine ive never encountered this problem. Ive stayed away from the zippo blu lighter because they changed the look but now if the blu2 looks like the traditional lighter I may pick one up. however im still partial to the classic zippo with a regular flame.


jam6088 January 14, 2012 3:45pm ET

This one looks better than the first but I still don't like the wave design where the lid meets the case. Seems to me that Zippo might be better served by making a high quality butane insert for their standard lighters. The ones on the market now are not that well made and personally I'd love to be able to use my older Zippo lighters to light my cigars


George C — Commack, NY, USA,  —  January 15, 2012 6:19am ET

I have it and it runs out of fuel way to fast.


Taylor Franklin January 15, 2012 7:47am ET

For sure a quality butane insert with a brass tank would be ideal.

And yes, the ones I've tried thus far are terrible.


Philip Spada — Glendale, CA, USA,  —  January 18, 2012 1:50am ET

I bought a Zippo Blu a couple years ago and sent it back to Zippo because the flame was too low and there was no mechanism for increasing the flsme. Zippo returned the Blu, allegedly repaired, but it still doesn't light my cigars to my satisfaction. I wouldn't recommend the lighter to anyone.


Bryan Galante — Senoia, Georgia, USA,  —  January 18, 2012 2:04pm ET

Have my traditional Zippo and normally use it to light cedar which in turns fires up my cigar. I'll have to look into these new lighter, but my engraved Zippo(it has my military unit and overseas services dates)still feels like it belongs with my favorite sticks!


Bryan Galante — Senoia, Georgia, USA,  —  January 18, 2012 2:10pm ET

Still enjoy my traditional engraved Zippo. It has my military unit and overseas services dates and it lights up a piece of cedar which I then use on my favorite stick. The new Zippo might be something I "ask" for as a gift.


David Dodd — Ashfield, NSW, Australia,  —  February 11, 2012 9:05pm ET

As a Zippo fan from way back I was utterly dissapointed at the agricultural feel of the Zippo Blu. What a tragic joke of a lighter.
Like trying to light a candle with a combine harvester.


entheosrix@gmail.com February 28, 2012 7:29pm ET

Still love colibri


Don Esteban — LHC, AZ, USA,  —  February 8, 2013 4:40pm ET

The rocket scientists at zippo STILL haven't been able to engineer an adjustable flame for the Blu. This amazes me.


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